Stem cell therapy will identify the causes of chronic pain

Regular readers will have met the Biodesign Challenge alumnae myself by now. Last month we launched a space called “science on my own terms” here at the Inquisitr. This space is the space through…

Stem cell therapy will identify the causes of chronic pain

Regular readers will have met the Biodesign Challenge alumnae myself by now. Last month we launched a space called “science on my own terms” here at the Inquisitr. This space is the space through which our team will bring technology that is in the laboratory to the clinic.

What I discovered in the field of chronic pain is that it is almost impossible to get a definitive answer as to why we experience chronic pain. Although there are many reasons to feel the pain associated with chronic pain, none of them are objective to the pain itself. So we ran this out as a patent pending therapy, that would, by trial and error, systematically identify the cause of these painful situations by studying a particular species of stem cell, Glial Cellrypsis.

It was not until after my residency that I got the opportunity to actually do just that. After years of studying glial cells – my main source of input for most of my post-doctoral work – I decided to finally help scientists and physicians better understand glial cells and explain their role in a lot of the conditions that lead to chronic pain.

I was then handpicked by Biotechnology & Biomedical Innovation leader and Pediatric Center Director, Dr. Arnab Gadiya to work on a collaborative project to study Glial Cellrypsis in adults. The research at this clinic can make a positive impact on treating pain, diabetic foot ulcers and diabetic retinopathy.

The folks from Dr. Gadiya’s office and my fellow colleagues in the Pain Lab at Glasgow University have completely dismantled the general scientific understanding of glial cells. Their approach represents a step forward to better understand the function and therapeutic value of glial cells in human health.

They believe that they can use glial cells, that comprise the body’s primary defense mechanism to defend against disease, to successfully fight our chronic pain. Since glial cells are distributed throughout the body, chronic pain provides an opportunity to specifically treat glial cells as they fight diseases such as glaucoma, MS and Parkinson’s disease, among others.

My colleagues and I believe that glial cells are part of the reason we carry chronic pain, and we need to be able to research and treat these cells if we are to understand the causes of chronic pain and better treat the disorders that stem from them.

This past week, Dr. Gadiya and I wrote up the first article in a two-part series called “The Brain’s Glial Support System”.

We are highly excited to share this article with the world. I hope you enjoy this detailed and relatable story of how a scientist may discover a novel therapy and the real work we are doing to bring it to patients, because no one should ever endure pain and be told that they are not at fault.

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This post was originally published on BioLogos.

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