Oprah talks personal struggles with her weight, body image

“Eminem is president and Oprah is my biographer,” she said, laughing to the camera. OK, we think that one joke is a little far fetched, but Oprah is really doing some interesting things with…

Oprah talks personal struggles with her weight, body image

“Eminem is president and Oprah is my biographer,” she said, laughing to the camera.

OK, we think that one joke is a little far fetched, but Oprah is really doing some interesting things with her next book.

The 65-year-old journalist, author and media mogul was part of a roundtable discussion Thursday night in L.A. to promote “Still the One: Adele Dazeem” that also included herself, singer Sting and Hollywood producer Tyler Perry.

All agreed that she’s reinvented herself in a way that others still haven’t figured out, and asked several pointed questions about her self-image and obsessions.

Oprah sat down for a candid conversation with five of her fellow experts: (from left) Erin Leyden of Alternatives Reproductive Health; GQ editor Jim Nelson; Anne Stanford of the National Council of Jewish Women; executive editor of Harper’s Bazaar and Vogue syndicated columnist Justine Picardie; and Shondaland executive producer and author Betsy Beers.

Highlights include:

— Oprah, who has been in a constant battle with her weight for decades, talks openly about her depression — as well as the difficulty of maintaining her newly slim body.

— Oprah asks an intriguing hypothetical, about a man “who is a shy guy who wants to lose weight. He eats but can’t get excited about what he’s eating.” The question is quickly asked: “Are you going to let him eat potato chips?” Oprah laughs it off, but says yes. “I would do that,” she says.

— Oprah talks about her own physical appearance. She did, however, try to give all of the panelists a break from speaking about their personal bodies. She joked that she’s “short and wears Spanx” and compared her appearance to “street meat” and “tall chicken.”

— Oprah talked about her focus on education. She said she was predisposed to it, but it was always a last resort. The trend is toward crisis prevention and prevention, so no longer does she consider “dealing with climate change and education to be about rescue.”

— Oprah went back to the idea of progression: “You have to continually be tested and advance. That’s the trajectory of growing up. And we may not always have the resources to do that, but the power of the human spirit is in the imagination. We’re all in the same space.”

Oprah’s life is like being “Ava Gardner stripped to her abs and left on the Vegas strip with a broken ankle,” she said.

“I’m not ready to stop,” she said. “I’m into anything that’s not moaning and groaning.”

She then told the story of telling a friend a month ago that she was getting on a plane to visit the U.S. Virgin Islands to shoot a Vanity Fair cover. The friend didn’t believe her, so Oprah started the flight half-wanting to hop on but half-saving her plane tickets.

It’s not an exaggeration to say that “Oprah has infiltrated our society. And she’s got a billion things going on at once,” Perry said.

Ultimately, Oprah told the audience about how trying to understand a person like herself can be off-putting. She said she thought she was brave when she got on a plane to go visit some of the places she’s spent years exploring. But she said she was terrified when she was actually on the flight.

“I felt like an idiot because I wasn’t really getting the experience,” she said.

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