11 ways female leaders have risen above the pressure of everyday working life

The Hollywood production exec didn’t need a big pile of dough to continue making the tough decisions. In her case, it was the best way to maintain the company culture. D Her 6-year-old became…

11 ways female leaders have risen above the pressure of everyday working life

The Hollywood production exec didn’t need a big pile of dough to continue making the tough decisions. In her case, it was the best way to maintain the company culture.

D

Her 6-year-old became the face of a new campaign designed to bring her family’s products to kids across the globe.

“Because I was getting up early to do these incredible things like picking paint brushes for a kid to spray art all over a city block, I didn’t have the luxury of letting my energy drain away to a day job where I had to go to work in the morning and leave at 3 o’clock. It allowed me to continue living a very normal life and spending quality time with my kids.”

4

The leader of a 25-person company remembers her former 9-to-5 day job quite fondly.

“[The fact that] I got to work with incredibly talented writers. They’re often the first to see a problem and the first to have a good idea of how to fix it. It allowed me to have someone working on my team that was more like a friend.”

5

She didn’t have time to go back to school, and this was a life-changing perk of her job.

“You can hire a lot of really really smart people. The flip side is that they get burnt out. And you’re not there to deal with those things. You’re there to get the work done.”

6

To wind down at the end of a grueling day at a startup, she stretches by riding her mountain bike. She believes that she would be much less content to work for a company that didn’t prioritize sustainable benefits.

“I don’t think you get what you put into the company. And I think as far as benefits go, I’m basically a hippie that wants to tear it all down because I think it’s too precious. It’s really about how they keep the talent and keeping the company together. I want to keep the only thing they have, which is me.”

7

She’s joined conversations about how to recruit the best female leaders.

“Often I’ll have an in-house meeting and my candidates that have received the most feedback feel the most intimidated. In that meeting, the woman might feel like ‘I don’t know how to answer this.’ That’s a really tough thing for women to have.”

8

When she’s recruiting new talent, she’s not asking how hard the candidate can work, she’s asking about their interests.

“As an executive, I like people who have lived. It’s really hard when you’re 5,000 miles away to absorb what’s going on in the real world and see how things can be done.”

9

“The women leaders are a group of individuals that really rise above everyone else in the organization. And that is something that really makes us a successful organization.”

10

She has a favourite piece of workplace advice from her former colleagues at Disney.

“They told me a pretty simple rule: Find your guide to greatness. Find someone that you think you could follow in an organization in the world. If you think you could follow them in the world, you’re going to be that person.

“Not because you’re close in any career, but because you can see yourself there. And you can see how to replicate that behavior.

“Everyone in this company was super passionate about the business and then once they figured out how to communicate how passionate they were, how they could get that message out, they became the people that people followed.”

11

This CEO faced rising anxiety from the realities of her company’s business climate and took solace in the advice of Mary Poppins.

“She made her glasses go to 11 to fend off self-doubt. And that really resonated with me. Because I also felt like my glasses were too small, and so I took them up to 11.”

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